A general introduction to the critical analysis of images and image-making through experimentation with the interface between performance and technology. Students are introduced to the digital programs needed for constructing and sequencing images and creating a hypertext presentation/performance.

Students develop their skills in various areas of costume, set construction, lighting, props, media, sound, makeup, scene painting, and marketing through work on building crews for Theatre Arts department productions. Assignments are project-based and require considerable time outside of class. May be repeated once.

A survey of the developments in theatre from the ancient Greeks to Moliere. The course will introduce the major periods and dramatic forms in theatre history, and explore the historical and social context in which dramatic work was created. Topics will include major plays and dramatists, theatre practitioners, innovations, and the role of theatre in a particular culture and society.

A survey of the developments in theatre from the English Restoration to the 20th Century. The course will introduce the major periods and dramatic forms in theatre history, and explore the historical and social context in which dramatic work was created. Topics will include major plays and dramatists, theatre practitioners, innovations, and the role of theatre in a particular culture or society.

The development of acting skills through improvisation and selected scenes and monologues from the contemporary theatre. Requires significant rehearsal hours outside of class. Designed for students seriously interested in performing.

The study and analysis of the American Pastime, its history, presentation, and impact through the lens of theatre and performance.

A workshop seminar on contemporary, alternative performance forms and mainstream theatre. Emphasis is on the development of critical perspectives and the writing skills needed to articulate responses to theatrical experiences through seminar discussions and writing workshops relevant to performances seen on trips to theatres in New York City and the region. This course requires students to make frequent trips to New York City to see productions; and students are responsible for the cost of tickets, most of which will be $20 or less.

A course covering the aesthetics and traditions of scenic, costume and lighting design. The lighting portion of the course includes an exploration of color, intensity and control through projects with theatre light boards as well as lighting design and drafting principles. The costume portion of the course introduces design and rendering basics as well as intermediate skill projects. The scenic part of the course includes exercises in design rendering, drafting and modeling which allow students to conceive and develop design concepts and ideas.

A design and analysis course emphasizing the construction of space in the two dimensions of the computer screen and the three dimensions of everyday reality. The course examines the way space is constructed and meanings are assigned to it and considers the effects of race, gender, ethnicity, and class on those interpretations. Projects involve use of digital programs for video manipulation and editing. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information.

An intermediate level study of stage costume design and technology, combining theory and practice. Students study the tradition and history of costume design and dress, do exercises in conceiving and rendering designs and learn about costume shop equipment, techniques, and materials.

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